Buddha Nature Reconsidered

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'''7.''' '''''Buddha Nature and the Tantric Causal Continuum'''''
 
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* {{i|7.1. Introduction to Excerpts [A–D] from Mi bskyod rdo rje's ''Explanation of the<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Direct Introduction to the Three Embodiments|295}}
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* {{i|7.1. Introduction to Excerpts [A–D] from Mi bskyod rdo rje's ''Explanation of the<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Direct Introduction to the Three Embodiments''|295}}
 
* {{i|7.2. Annotated Translation [A]: On the Connection Between the Three <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Continua|297}}
 
* {{i|7.2. Annotated Translation [A]: On the Connection Between the Three <br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Continua|297}}
 
* {{i|7.3. Critical Edition [A]: ''Sku gsum ngo sprod rnam bshad'' excerpt|305}}
 
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'''9.''' '''''Buddha Nature and the Tantric Resultant Continuum'''''
 
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* {{i|9.2. Annotated Translation: Excerpt on Buddha Nature, the Tantric Resultant<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Continuum from Mi bskyod rdo rje's ''Explanation of the Direct Introduction<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;to the Three Embodiments|382}}
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* {{i|9.2. Annotated Translation: Excerpt on Buddha Nature, the Tantric Resultant<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Continuum from Mi bskyod rdo rje's ''Explanation of the Direct Introduction<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;to the Three Embodiments''|382}}
 
* {{i|9.3. Critical Edition: ''Sku gsum ngo sprod rnam bshad'' excerpt|390}}
 
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Latest revision as of 23:13, 31 July 2020

Buddha Nature Reconsidered
Book
Book
Buddha Nature Reconsidered - Vol 1-front.jpeg

This is David Higgins and Martina Draszczyk's second book together and comes out of their first study, Mahāmudrā And The Middle Way. In their follow up they have delivered another two volumes on the writings of the Eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje (1507-1554) and his nuanced approach to the intricacies of the buddha-nature debate. An approach that combines the yogic sensibilities of Mahāmudrā with the dialectic approach of the Madhyamaka, which, according to the authors, Mikyö Dorje characterizes as the Yuganaddha-Apratiṣṭhāna-Madhyamaka (zung ’jug rab tu mi gnas pa’i dbu ma), that is, as a “Nonfoundational (or Nonabiding) Middle Way consisting in Unity.” As the authors explain,

"This nomenclature tells us much about the central philosophical aims and presuppositions of the Eighth Karma pa and his Karma bka’ brgyud tradition. As a Mahāmudrā proponent, Mi bskyod rdo rje gives primacy to innate modes of being and awareness, such as coemergent wisdom or buddha nature naturally endowed with qualities, that are amenable only to direct yogic perception and revealed through the personal guidance of a qualified teacher. As an exponent of yuganaddha (zung ’jug), i.e., unity (literally, “yoking together”), he espouses the tantric goal of unity beyond extremes, a goal grounded in the inseparability of the two truths or realities (bden gnyis dbyer med), of appearance and emptiness (snang stong dbyer med). In his eyes, this unity is only fully realized when one understands that the conventional has no independent existence apart from the ultimate and that the latter is a condition of possibility of the former. As an advocate of apratiṣṭhāna (rab tu mi gnas pa), i.e., nonfoundationalism, he resolutely maintains that all outer and inner phenomena, including deep features of reality disclosed through meditation, lack any ontic or epistemic essence or foundation that the mind can lay hold of. Finally, as a champion of Madhyamaka, i.e., the Buddhist Middle Way, the author attempts to ply a middle course between the extremes of existence and nonexistence, eternalism and nihilism. These various doxographical strands are deftly interwoven in the Karma pa’s view of buddha nature, which affirms the innate presence of buddha nature and its qualities in all sentient beings as well as their soteriological efficacy while denying either any ontological status." (Higgins and Draszczyk, preface, 14)

Citation Higgins, David, and Martina Draszczyk. Buddha Nature Reconsidered: The Eighth Karma pa's Middle Path. 2 vols. Volume 1: Introduction and Analysis. Volume 2: An Anthology of His Writings: Critical Texts and Annotated Translations. Wiener Studien zur Tibetologie und Buddhismuskunde 95.1–95.2. Vienna: Arbeitskreis für Tibetische und Buddhistische Studien Universität Wien, 2019.