dharmadhātu

From Buddha-Nature

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Glossarydharmadhātu

Sanskrit Noun

dharmadhātu

expanse of phenomena
धर्मधातु
ཆོས་དབྱིངས་
法界

Basic Meaning

The fundamental expanse from which all phenomena emerge.

Has the Sense of

The ultimate source of phenomenal appearances, or the basic nature which allows for phenomena to arise in all their multiplicity. It is often treated as a synonym for emptiness and the ultimate truth.

On this topic
Term Variations
Key Term dharmadhātu
Topic Variation dharmadhātu
Tibetan ཆོས་དབྱིངས་  ( chöying)
Wylie Tibetan Transliteration chos dbyings  ( chöying)
Devanagari Sanskrit धर्मधातु
Romanized Sanskrit dharmadhātu
Chinese 法界
Buddha-nature Site Standard English expanse of phenomena
Richard Barron's English Term basic space of phenomena
Jeffrey Hopkin's English Term sphere of reality
Gyurme Dorje's English Term expanse of reality
Ives Waldo's English Term ultimate sphere
Term Information
Source Language Sanskrit
Basic Meaning The fundamental expanse from which all phenomena emerge.
Has the Sense of The ultimate source of phenomenal appearances, or the basic nature which allows for phenomena to arise in all their multiplicity. It is often treated as a synonym for emptiness and the ultimate truth.
Related Terms śūnyatāparamārthasatya
Term Type Noun
Definitions
Rangjung Yeshe Dictionary Dharmadhatu, ultimate sphere, totality of being, total field of events and meanings, the sphere of Dharma, field of all events and meanings, reality field, element of [superior] qualities, dharmadhatu, realm of dharmas, {chos khams}; the dimension of all existence; the expanse of All That Is; the sphere of Dharma, expanse of all events, absolute expanse
TshigmdzodChenmo 1) stong pa nyid/ ... 2) gzugs kyi phung po la sogs pa phung po lnga'i rang bzhin stong pa nyid gang yin pa/
Other Definitions Jeffrey Hopkins' Comment: An equivalent of ultimate truth (don dam bden pa, paramArthasatya) so called because meditation within observing it acts as a cause of the qualities (dharma, chos) of Superiors (Arya, 'phags pa)." Emptiness, being uncaused, is not itself a cause (element), but meditation on it causes the development of marvelous qualities; thus, emptiness comes to be called a cause, an element producing those qualities.